Benefits of Sprouting | Detox Series

When you sprout, you give life to the seed

So what’s the big deal about sprouting?! What’s the magic behind this simple, ancient food practice?

Sprouting unlocks the life potential and health benefits of legumes, nuts, seeds and grains. Sprouting is a key alchemical process essential to many traditional diets, it embodies the essence of #slowliving and #slowfood. Our ancestors ate sprouted foods. Sprouting supports healthy digestion, nourishes a healthy human experience and is fundamental to our co-creative relationship with the earth and her plants.

When you sprout, you give life to your food and you literally start growing a seed. Sprouting increases available nutrients and it removes enzyme inhibitors. Sprouting also transforms most seeds, nuts, and legumes to have an alkalizing effect on the body, amazing! Before a nut, seed, grain or legume is sprouted it likely has an acidifying effect on the body, bleh. THIS IS HUGE! Given that many people are suffering from disease due to an overly acidifying diet, the simple act of sprouting can change everything! Well, sprouting along with eating lots of fresh organic fruits and vegetables, can change everything!!!

In traditional diets, people sprouted! The Chinese sprouted their mung beans for long journeys at sea, which unlocked the Vitamin C in the bean, preventing scurvy! They knew that sprouted mung beans offer so much more than non-germinated mung beans.

“According to enzyme specialist Dr. Edward Howell, in the past we ate most of our grains in partially germinated form. Grain standing in sheaves and stacks in open fields often began to sprout before it was brought into storage. Modern farming techniques prevent grains from germinating before they reach our tables.” – Sally Fallon, Nourishing Traditions: The Cookbook that Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and the Diet Dictocrats

Sprouting transforms the nutritional composition of nuts, seeds, legumes and grains in so MANY beneficial ways. It increases Vitamin C, Carotene and B Vitamins, especially B2, B5 and B6. Sprouting also neutralizes phytic acid, which inhibits the absorption of calcium, magnesium, iron, copper and zinc. And if that’s not enough to convince you of the power and importance of sprouting…sprouting also neutralizes enzyme inhibitors present in all seeds, which can neutralize our own enzymes in our digestive tract!! You need those enzymes to properly digest your food! And in addition to all that amazingness, numerous enzymes that support digestion are produced during the sprouting process! So all around, you’ll be winning with sprouting.

Wouldn’t you rather be eating food that’s alive, activated with it’s nutrient composition enhanced by the life you’ve given to it?!

Below is a sprouting guide to give you sense of it all, but I encourage you to start experimenting, listen to the seeds, attune to the sprouts and to the life within them. Follow your intuition and learn from the process.

Some foods you can buy already sprouted, likely at a health food store or online.

  • Sprouted lentils
  • Sprouted quinoa
  • Sprouted flax crackers
  • Sprouted oats
  • Sprouted bread
  • Sprouted pasta
  • Sprouted buckwheat cereal
  • Sprouted Ezekiel cereal
  • Sprouted almonds
  • Sprouted sunflower seeds

Many foods you can easily soak and sprout on your own. All nuts and seeds need to be raw.

  • Lentils
  • Quinoa
  • Mung beans
  • Sunflower seeds
  • Almonds
  • Sesame seeds
  • So much more!

Below is a sprouting guide to give you sense of it all, but I encourage you to start experimenting, listen to the seeds, attune to the sprouts and to the life within them. Follow your intuition and learn from the process.

What you’ll need:

  • Nuts, seeds, legumes, or grains to sprout
  • Large Jar
  • Sprouting Jar Lid
  • Clean water for soaking and rinsing
  • Sprouting Jar Rack (optional)

How to Sprout:

Sprouting involves soaking for a sustained period of time, sometimes a few hours, sometimes overnight, depending on what you’re sprouting. Then draining, rinsing, draining, rinsing, draining, rinsing for at least a day depending on the seed and often longer if you’re going for bigger sprouts. After the soaking period and some sprouting time, with many foods, you’ll start to see little tiny tails popping out of the seeds. You can eat them when they’re very young and little or wait until the tails grow a bit longer. The flavor will change over time, so try it and taste and discover how you like you’re sprouts. Always refrigerate your sprouts once they are grown. 

Using a jar with a sprouting jar lid is the most efficient and easiest way to sprout. I highly recommend these sprouting jar lids, I’ve been using them for a while and they are holding up really well! If you want to get serious about sprouting, a rack to keep sprouting  jars upside down to properly drain and increase airflow will help. I don’t find these necessary for simple sprouting, like lentils and mung beans.

Certain foods may need more care during the sprouting process than others. It’s also important to note that in hotter temperatures, the process happens more quickly and the sprouts need to be rinsed and drained much more often. I suggest putting your jar in the fridge to slow the process and preserve the food if it’s really hot outside and you can’t be home all day to rinse your sprouts every few hours. Some things like lentils will continue to sprout in the fridge, they’ll just go much slower than if they’re at room temperature. 

Here is a chart with estimates of soaking and sprouting time.

Notes:

A few other important notes from Sally Fallon… It’s actually NOT recommended to sprout alfalfa! So avoid those alfalfa sprouts. Tests have shown that alfalfa sprouts inhibit the immune system. Also nuts that have been broken when removed from their shells like pecans and walnuts, cannot be sprouted. An overnight soak in warm, salted water will still neutralize sprout inhibitors and improve the nutritional quality of the nut.

If you’re doing the Bio Cleanse Detox, remember that sprouting is essential to make grains, nuts, seeds and legumes more alkalizing for the body. Alkalizing the body is essential for this cleansing process, including during the cleanse preparation and after you’ve completed your cleanse. If you’re doing the gentle cleanse, you’ll be eating alkalizing vegan food the entire time.

Source

Nourishing Traditions: The Cookbook that Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and the Diet Dictocrats by Sally Fallon

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